so

The long way ’round

Volume 3, Issue 22; 06 Oct 2019

Going for a walk.

My apartment complex is up on a hill and at the base of that hill lies an entrance to Barton Creek Greenbelt. It’s a great area for walking, jogging, cycling (if you’re a certain kind of off-road enthusiast, which I’m not), rock climbing, and, occasionally, swimming.

[Image]
Swim at your own risk

Trouble is, if I walk down the hill into the greenbelt, I can go left or right and walk for a ways, but eventually I have to turn around and walk back. That’s fine, but it’s a little bit repetitive.

The other “nearby” entrance to the greenbelt is on the other side of Loop 360. I’m sure it is possible to cross that road on foot. Absurdly, obscenely dangerous, but possible. I’ve no desire to try. Nor am I willing to cycle on it.

[Image]
Between the roads

Within the last year or so (give or take), the city completed a pedestrian bridge over 360. It’s now possible to leave my apartment, walk along the Mopac Expressway access road (which, remarkably, has sidewalks, at least on this side), and cross Loop 360 in safety. In theory, then, it’s possible to make a loop on the greenbelt. And in practice, it turns out.

That complicated squiggle in the middle is me trying to avoid walking around the oxbow in (at this time of year, the bone dry bed of) Barton Creek, eventually “succeeding”, and pretty surely walking further than if I’d just followed the obvious trail.

All-in-all six(ish) miles around the loop. Not bad for a Saturday afternoon hike! And a loop I hope to explore more often!

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